Ninja Announces an Ellen Fund Live Stream!

Ellen’s favorite Twitch streamer, Ninja, made a video appearance on the show today to give Ellen an update on all things "Fortnite," and to surprise her with a special charity stream. With over 12 million followers, Ninja is the most followed streamer on the live video game streaming platform. Ninja announced he will be doing a live charity stream, with all proceeds going to The Ellen Fund!

Be sure to tune on Ninja’s Twitch site right here on Friday, November 23 for the charity stream!

While you’re waiting, watch Ellen & Ninja play Fortnite together here

Mountain Gorillas reclassified to Endangered

It’s a fragile win that required decades of on-the-ground protection by hundreds of dedicated humans, many of whom lost their lives to help the gorillas.

In 1978, Dian Fossey rightly thought that the mountain gorillas — with only 240 in existence! — would be extinct by the year 2000. Thankfully, as you know, they aren’t. Due to the intensive protection efforts that Fossey started, mountain gorillas are now up to just over 1000 in existence.

This is still an incredibly small number of individuals… but enough to warrant their reclassification from “critically endangered” to “endangered.” It’s a fragile win that required decades of on-the-ground protection by hundreds of dedicated humans, many of whom lost their lives to help the gorillas.

Read more on The Fossey Fund’s site…

Saving Golden Monkeys

The Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund has studied golden monkeys in Rwanda for years, because they are a critical part of gorilla habitat, as well as a fascinating facet of the forest’s biodiversity.

The Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund has studied golden monkeys in Rwanda for years, because they are a critical part of gorilla habitat, as well as a fascinating facet of the forest’s biodiversity. They are also an endangered species and it is believed that their population is declining.

Our golden monkey research was initiated by our biodiversity research program manager Deogratias Tuyisingize, who first arrived in our field programs as an intern in 2004 and is now completing his Ph.D. research through the University of Rwanda on conservation of the golden monkey and its habitat, as well as overseeing our expanded biodiversity programs.

This month, much of this work culminated in the first-ever regional golden monkey conservation action plan workshop, in which stakeholders from the parks where golden monkeys live, as well as other conservationists and community representatives, were in attendance. Tuyisingize and other experts presented information on golden monkey ecology, including population trends, habitat and diets, threats and other issues.

The workshop was the first step in creating an action plan, following input from all participants and an additional meeting early next year to determine a five-year strategy, with specific objectives, timelines, budgets and responsibilities of the various organizations. In addition, international institutions and researchers will also be invited to join in the process.

Read the full article here…

Nature Needs Life Support

The Living Planet Report 2018 shows that wildlife populations have declined by over half in less than 50 years.

Plummeting numbers of mammals, reptiles, amphibians, birds and fish around the world are an urgent sign that nature needs life support. Our Living Planet Report 2018 shows population sizes of wildlife decreased by 60% globally between 1970 and 2014.

For the last 20 years, scientists from ZSL, WWF and other organisations, have been monitoring changes in the populations of thousands of animal species around the world. Sadly, they’ve concluded that the variety of life on Earth and wildlife populations is disappearing fast.

Read more here…

Gorillas & Human Dads: More Alike than You Thought!

More than five decades later, the Fossey Fund’s continued research on this population—which makes them one  of the world’s longest-studied animals—is still providing critical insights into what it means to be a gorilla, or a human.

(From The Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund)

A new study based on research at the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund in Rwanda and just published in “Scientific Reports” suggests that male mountain gorillas who are nice to infants have greater success in siring more infants.

This finding is scientifically noteworthy because it contradicts what was long believed about male gorilla reproduction and male primates in general—that all that matters is the ability to fight for the dominant position, not whether you’re a good parent.

The study’s senior author, Fossey Fund President and CEO/Chief Scientific Officer Dr. Tara Stoinski, says this study shows that long-term study of a species continues to pay off in unexpected ways.

“Dian Fossey first went to study these mountain gorillas in the 1960s, with the goal of furthering our understanding of human evolution,” Dr. Stoinski says. “More than five decades later, the Fossey Fund’s continued research on this population—which makes them one  of the world’s longest-studied animals—is still providing critical insights into what it means to be a gorilla, or a human,” she adds.

Read full article here…

Prince William: "It's heartbreaking..."

“It's heartbreaking to think that by the time my children, George, Charlotte and Louis are in their 20s, elephants, rhinos and tigers might well be extinct in the wild.” – Prince William

LONDON -- Prince William has told a two-day international wildlife protection conference that he could not face his children if his generation allows elephants, tigers and other species to become extinct.

"It's heartbreaking to think that by the time my children, George, Charlotte and Louis are in their 20s, elephants, rhinos and tigers might well be extinct in the wild," he told the Illegal Wildlife Trade Conference hosted by the British government.


Born on Gorilla Day

World Gorilla Day – which is also not coincidentally the anniversary of Karisoke – saw the birth of a new baby gorilla... one of only a few hundred left alive.

Mother Ishyaka and the yet-to-be-named baby live in Kureba’s group with dominant silverback Ishavu. The baby has an older sister (Akariza) who is almost 3.5 years old. The new baby was born on World Gorilla Day, which is great! And he comes from two great gorilla dynasties, his great grandmother on his mom’s side is Effie, who was an extremely successful female, grandmother of Cantsbee and many other famous gorillas.

And his great grandmom on his dad’s side is Flossie, who was the mother of Titus of Gorilla King fame.

Mom Ishyaka and new baby (c) Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund

 Born on World Gorilla Day! (c) Dian Fossey Fund

Born on World Gorilla Day! (c) Dian Fossey Fund